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Stryder

Storing Z

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Well I'm going to have to put the Z in storage for about 5 months. I'm looking for a list of things I should do such as unhooking the battery. Thanks all.

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take the tires off and put them in a black plastic bag and store em like up on a self or someplace were they wont be in the way and wont be in bright light.

this prevents dryrotting

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I thought if you drain the gas then the tank is empty and it will rust. Aren't you supposed to fill the tank and add fuel stabilizer?

Here are some more tips:

1. Wash the car completely, wax all painted and polished surfaces.

2. Drain oil regardless of mileage since oil change and replace with normal quantity of fresh oil.

3. Remove battery and coat cable terminals with petroleum jelly. If there is evidence of acid spillage around the battery tray, neutralize with baking soda and repaint.

4. Remove spark plugs and add a small quantity of oil to each cylinder. Turn the engine a few revolutions. Install spark plugs.

5. Insert a paper card, lightly saturated with silicone oil, between the points (if you still have points).

6. Check tire pressures.

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Yep my time has come Ben. It's all good though. I can't wait to spend spring and summer sweating my arse off in Missouri.

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Charlie,

5 months is not really long term storage. That is what we mid-westerners have to deal with every year.

I would recommend that you:

1) fill the gas tank and add stabil to the gas.

2) when you are ready to place it in its hibernating place, drive the car for at least 20 minutes to get it up to operating temperature. Then park it, shut it off and don't restart it till you take it out of hibernation.

3) take the battery out and put it in the basement or somewhere warm and dry. Put a piece of wood under it. Never put a battery on concrete.

4) Some one else said to remove the tires. You can do that, or just jack the car up just enough to take the pressure off the tires and put it on jack stands. You don't necessarily want to have it high enough for the springs to hang and sag.

5) clean and wax as someone said.

6) if there is a possibility of rodents being in the area, stuff a rag in your tail pipe and air cleaner snout, shut the floor air vents and place a dish of moth balls inside the car. Cover it with a car cover.

7) Buy a subscription to Z SPort Magazine, read this forum and buy all the parts you will need for your next project when you bring it out again. This helps from getting bummed out from not driving it!

Some of the other suggestions are good too. It just depends on how far you want to go. 5 months is not too bad. Hopefully that won't grow into a long term thing. But if it does, it should be well prepared.

Good luck,

Marty

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Originally posted by Marty Rogan

Charlie,

3) Never put a battery on concrete.

I've heard this before, why?

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This is a post I found on the internet or web for storing batterys.And it is also good to store your battery in a cool dry place.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SELF-DISCHARGING

Self-discharge goes on all the time. It's a battery fact of life that they get weaker from "just sitting". How rapidly a battery self-discharges depends on battery type. A lead-calcium battery discharges at a much slower rate than a conventional battery. Lead calcium discharges at 1/300 volt per day. Conventional lead-antimony batteries discharge at 1/100 volt per day.

What Adds To Rate of Self-Discharge?

As outside temperature rises, so does the rate of discharge. A battery stored at 95° F will discharge twice as fast as a battery stored at 75° F, and a temperature of 130° F is deadly to a battery. In some parts of the country, garages and storage building easily reach that temperature in the summer.

Accessories like clocks and computer memory will discharge the battery even when the ignition is off. And remember that the battery is self-discharging on its own at the same time the accessories are drawing on the battery.

Short trips (under 15 or 20 miles) will also add to the drain on your battery because the charging system doesn't have time to make up for losses from normal starting and self-discharging.

(Some people believe that letting the battery sit on concrete causes it to discharge faster. This is absolutely not true. The battery discharges at the same rate whether it is on concrete, stones, macadam, sand, or dirt.)

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Tires: smear lightly with lanolin so they don't dry out, then store in a trash bag.

Battery: The cold won't hurt, but HEAT will. Storing on the concrete is OK, but if the acid leaks ( non-sealed batteries) you get pitting.

That's why you don't store on the concrete!

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6) if there is a possibility of rodents being in the area, stuff a rag in your tail pipe and air cleaner snout,

You should do this for another reason too: Plug the exhaust and intake when warm to prevent cool moist air being drawn into the system.

Apart from that:

Fill the tank to full (no need to use stabiliser - I've started cars up after 6 years on stored tank of fuel)

Pump up the tyres to well over the recommended pressure and store the car off the ground on stands.

Leave the windows slightly open to allow air circulation and place a pest strip in the car.

Spray the undersides, wheel arches, and any chrome with odourless fishoil (looks greasy but you can wash it off when the car is remobilised)

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Concrete is EARTH:ie a ground

the energy stored in a battery is only 1/8 of an inch from a ground source ie; the earth

the average collector stores his/her battery (when outside the car) on the least coductive material available, Usually a good DRY piece of wood.

A new plastic battery tray (when stored in the car) and the battery disconnected is almost as good as long as the wheels are still on the vehicle and insulating the car from the ground.

Dave.

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Hi,

All of the above are true and recommended, although just disconnetcing the battery should be sufficient, instead of completely removing it.

If it were me I would put the car on jack stands and remove the wheels and tires to prevent flat spotting more than anything.

Also by removing the tires you take the weight off of the springs so they don't hang under the weight, therefore removing them relaxes the suspension.

Tying them up in black plastic bags is also a good idea and a cheap way to keep them clean and nice. I have heard others suggest placing cardboard in between the tires that are in a stack as well?

Todd

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Charlie , if the car is to be stored inside this is one thing, if out side that is another. 5 months is not that long. When I winterise my inboard V-8 I fill the fuel tank, this keeps the tank from moisture. I change the oil and change the filter after running the engine to normal driving temp. I then start it again and run it to lube all the bearings with the fresh oil , shut it off , pull the coil wire , pull the plugs and squirt some oil in the plug holes and reinstall the plugs . with the coil wire still disconnected turn the engine over a few times. This will coat the cylinders with oil. pull the battery and wash it down with water and bakeing soda to remove any dirt and crud. This stuff will discharge the batt. then charge the battery and store it in a cool place , I just put mine on the work bench . If you want you can put some stabelizer in the fuel , but 5 mo is really not that long. A year that is a different matter. Putting a rag in the exhaust pipe wont hurt also in the intake of the filter box . If you have a cover that is good as well , keeps the dust off the paint. Now this is for inside a garage.

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