Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
wolf66

compressed the rear bumper mounts....

Recommended Posts

.......on my '77, think it looks alot better and still gives more protection then no bumper.

attachment.php?s=&postid=78070

post-5751-14150793681435_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the bumper shocks don't have any spring action, then your bumpers are totally useless. Before, the shocks allowed the bumper to take a light bump (5 MPH) without damage. So now, if your bumper shocks have no spring, then the force of an impace goes straight into the body/frame, or the shocks themselves will get squashed like a pop can.

A better option would be to get shorter bumper shocks, but then you still run the risk of bending the sheetmetal if you get bumped because the bumpers are too close with no room to move.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it was this or take em off....and the shocks action won't do diddly in a high speed rear ending, it was only in the Fed 5 mph

crash test that it was useful, and i don't back into stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uh Oh, you got one of those bars with the pivotting ends...

Those bars don't help you much, because the pivots still allow the suspension to flex, like a wobbly rectangle-- it just keeps the geometry the same. One with rigid ends is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well i cranked down on all the nuts, its pretty tight and seems to be fairly rigid, bet its worth all of $23!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No mater how hard you tighten the nuts, they're still too lose when you flex the 2400 lb. car ( did you put 2000 ft-lbs of torque on the bolts?) Really... Maybe later on you could weld in a gusset to your properly-adjusted bar to permanently set the ends, then chrome/paint everything.

Then again, for $8 you could buy a steel pipe and make one that's just as functional.

Actually, the best way to make it really rigid would be to run a bar from the frame rail on one side to the top of the strut on the other (diagonally), then the other way. That way there's no way things could flex. The hubs would have to break off!

Isn't the engine in the way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by wolf66

Well it was this or take em off....and the shocks action won't do diddly in a high speed rear ending, it was only in the Fed 5 mph

crash test that it was useful, and i don't back into stuff.

I assume you drained them to get them to collapse. Maybe you could cut them a little shorter and stick a spring (motorcycle shock?) in there for some some minimal protection.

Does look much better tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you describe the process you did to get it to go in? Did you hsave to remove the stuff?

thx.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by TomoHawk

Uh Oh, you got one of those bars with the pivotting ends...

Those bars don't help you much, because the pivots still allow the suspension to flex, like a wobbly rectangle-- it just keeps the geometry the same. One with rigid ends is better.

You get what you pay for. Remember, those bars that Megan Racing or whatever ebay name they use are for a Honda Civic, they're cheap and they are basically for looks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well if you take the bumper off there is a screw there to release the pressure, mine was all rusted so i just drilled through it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if A is well bolted down (i have spacers under C) and B is a fairly stiff/thick bar and D has no play (ie close tolerances around the bolt) and is real tight, where would most of the flex happen?

attachment.php?s=&postid=78094

post-5751-14150793681969_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like you only have the bracket attached with the one strud. If you really wanted to make things stiffer, you need to have at least 2 of the studs, all 3 would look best and be best.

No matter how tight you make that bolt, it will move there because of how heavy the car is. I think the best thing you could do with that is to put a second bolt through, but it looks like the bar won't reach in far enough. More mods.

The second bolt would make things much stiffer, and you wouldn't have to make the nut REALLY tight, Just make things so there is (zero) slop.

the bracket looks nice tho. If you wanted a functional bar, you could get some aluminum pipe (3/4 inch dia) then flatten the ends enough to fit between those two fingers on the bracket, and put 2 bolts though on each end. You might have to bend a hump into the bar to clear the engine.

It's up to you. If you like it, it doesn't matter what anybody else says.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

naw, i just haven't drilled the other bolt hole where i want it, it will have 2 bolts though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wolf66, does your hood close? I borrowed the same bar from the kid down the street and drilled the other hole with my drill press. It mounted up okay on my 78 but the hood wouldn't close so I gave it back.

post-3797-14150793682069_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have to push it a little firmer then before so i suspect it is hitting but not enough to stop it from closing properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You better make SURE bit's not hitting or else you'll get those neat little bumps on your hood. Maybe the bumps are good- to help you find the exact place to use the holesaw to drill a clearance hole! LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.